5 Things The CQC Tell Service Users To Expect

The Care Quality Commission are ultimately there to ensure that people who receive care get the best quality care possible. They have produced a booklet for service users, entitled: "What standards you have a right to expect from the regulation of agencies that provide care in your own home". I thought it would be useful to have a look at this booklet as it gives an insight to what service users are advised to expect from their own care.

  1. "You can expect to be respected, involved and told what's happening at every stage." The notes for this section suggests it is regarding meeting Outcome 1: Respecting and involving people who use services and Outcome 2: Consent to care and treatment
  2. "You can expect care, treatment and support that meet your needs" The notes for this section suggests it is regarding meeting Outcome 4: Care and welfare of people who use services, Outcome 5: Meeting nutritional needs and Outcome 6: Cooperating with other providers
  3. "You can expect to be safe." The notes for this section suggests it is regarding meeting Outcome 7: Safeguarding people who use services from abuse and Outcome 11: Safety, availability and suitability of equipment
  4. "You can expect to be cared for by staff with the right skills to do their jobs properly." The notes for this section suggests it is regarding meeting Outcome 12: Requirements relating to workers, Outcome 13: Staffing and Outcome 14: Supporting workers
  5. "You can expect the agency providing personal care to routinely check the quality of its services." The notes for this section suggests it is regarding meeting Outcome 16: Assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision, Outcome 17: Complaints and Outcome 21: Records

However, there are 3 of the 16 essential standards that don't seem to be obviously covered. However, they might fall within point 2 or 3 above.

  • Outcome 8: Cleanliness and infection control
  • Outcome 9: Management of medicines
  • Outcome 10: Safety and suitability of premises

The booklet goes onto advise that service users that if they experience care that does not meet the national standards you can (my emphasis):

  • "raise concerns with the agency, including making a formal complaint; and
  • tell us about the matter"

They go on to say, "You can tell us about concerns even when you do not want to make a complain to the agency. We also want to hear about good experiences of care." This would suggest it is a very good idea to take a very active approach to ensuring you are providing quality care. Obviously, it is good practice to check the quality of care on an ongoing basis as per Outcomes 16, 17 and 21 however this advice reinforces the idea that if you don't you could very easily end up being reported to the CQC.

The flip side of this is that you should encourage your service users to let the CQC know when they have compliments. Using the CQC widget you can make it really easy for your service providers to give feedback via your website.